SPELDATUM

  • 22 Jan 2019 15:00

Biljetter: ord 90 kr (plus serviceavgift 10 kr), stud/ungdom under 26 år 30 kr, pensionär 70 kr (plus serviceavgift 10 kr)
Te och scones ingår i biljettpriset

PHILOSOPHY TEA 

This spring Professor Peter Wallensteen and Lecturer Daniel Ogden will continue their popular Philosophy Tea talks.


Tuesday 22nd January - Jean-Jacques Rousseau: A misunderstood philosopher?

Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778) was, and still is, a controversial thinker. He has been blamed for the excesses of the French Revolution and preparing the way for twentieth-century totalitarianism. But is this a fair assessment of Rousseau? In order to try to answer this question, our philosophy tea will focus on Rousseau’s first important philosophical work, Discourse on the Arts and Sciences (1750), in which he first set forth his ideas on the natural goodness of humankind and how it has been corrupted by civilization. These ideas would play an important role in the development of his later, more mature political philosophy, and give rise to much of the controversy surrounding his name. By re-examining Rousseau’s ideas on nature and society, we hope to shed light not only on the impact he had on Enlightenment and Romantic thinking, but also what relevance he might have for us today.


Tuesday 12th February - Rachel Carson Silent Spring: A call to save the environment

When Rachel Carson’s book Silent Spring was published in 1962 it was an instant bestseller and a resounding alarm-bell: human activities were about to destroy the very conditions that made human existence possible. Being a marine biologist Carson (1907-1964) had observed the impact, for instance, chemicals like DDT on wild-life. Her documentation of these effects helped to galvanize public action, led to a questioning of human domination of the planet’s resources and resulted in debates on appropriate policies that still are ongoing. In this session we will discuss Carson’s arguments, their precedents and continued importance.


Wednesday 20th March - W. E. B. DuBois and Pan Africanism

“The problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line”, The Souls of Black Folks (1903).

What unites the African Union in Addis Ababa and former president, Barack Obama, in the White House? The threads go back to W. E. B. Dubois (1868-1963), the first African-American to get a Ph. D. from Harvard University; a sociologist and a proponent of Black liberation. His work inspired independence for Africa through Pan Africanism, as well as civil rights in the United States. Since he is largely unknown in Europe, our Philosophy Tea will highlight this important proponent of human equality.

Med speciell gäst Tor Sellström, medborgarrättsaktivist & panafrikanist

  


Daniel Ogden is a researcher and teacher of utopian ideas, for many years at Uppsala University and now at Mälardalen University.

Peter Wallensteen was the first holder of the Dag Hammarskjöld Chair in Peace and Conflict Research (1985-2012) and is now Senior Professor at Uppsala University.

Each philosophy tea session lasts one hour, with the final twenty minutes being reserved for an open discussion with the audience. The sessions are run in English. 

Tea and scones will be served. All welcome. 

In collaboration with Uppsala University. The sessions will be disseminated as pod casts.

» Read more about Philosophy Tea since 2014



Podcast Producer: Reginateatern



Podcast Producer: Reginateatern



Podcast Producer: Reginateatern



Podcast Producer: Reginateatern

Podcast Producer: Reginateatern

Podcast Producer: Reginateatern

Podcast Producer: Reginateatern


Podcast Producer: Reginateatern


Listen to the podcast with Peter Wallensteen and Daniel Ogden on Bertha von Suttner at Regina Theatre 8th feb 2017 here:



Podcast Producer: Reginateatern


Podcast Producer: Reginateatern




Podcast Producer: Per Torsner

Podcast Producer: Per Torsner


Podcast Producer: Per Torsner